Posted by: ktzefr | November 16, 2018

Day of the Dead Ofrendas: Friday Fotos

San Juan de Dios Church, San Miguel de Allende, GTO; Photo:KFawcett

Earlier this month I was in Mexico, again, for Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos).  It’s one of the most fascinating holidays I’ve experienced anywhere.  The ofrendas (offerings or altars) are an essential part of the celebration. Some people mistakenly think that Mexicans who set up ofrendas for their dead relatives or friends are actually worshiping them.  They are not.  The ofrenda or altar is created in memory of a loved one with photos, mementos, and other objects (food, musical instruments, books, tequila, Coke etc.) that represent a person’s life.  The ofrenda designs are created with beans, rice, colored paper, flowers (millions of marigolds), and other natural and man-made products. Sometimes altars are also made in memory of a famous person or groups of people.

This tribute to Anthony Bourdain was displayed at Chef Donnie Masterton’s The Restaurant…

Ofrenda in The Restaurant, San Miguel de Allende; Photo:KFawcett

and this one graphically memorialized journalists who have died…

Ofrenda, San Juan de Dios church, San Miguel de Allende; 2018

A walk through these colorful, elaborate displays shows not only the respect and love the Mexican people feel for others in their lives but it allows the visitor to get to know them as well.  It’s amazing how much one can learn about total strangers from these personal offerings.  Mexicans believe their loved ones return at this time every year; for two days in November their memories are brought back to life so they won’t ever be forgotten. 

Here is a very small sample from the San Juan de Dios church in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato:

Ofrenda, San Juan de Dios, San Miguel de Allende; Photo:KFawcett

Ofrenda, San Juan de Dios, San Miguel de Allende; Photo:KFawcett

Ofrenda, San Juan de Dios, San Miguel de Allende; Photo:KFawcett

Ofrendas, San Juan de Dios church, San Miguel de Allende; Photo:KFawcett

Ofrenda, Casa de la Questa, San Miguel de Allende; Photo:KFawcett

Next time: The People

 


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